The fence-like enclosures are designed for cars to drive in and conceal prostitutes and customers as they conduct their business.



The proposed installation was prompted by thousands of complaints about the prostitutes who line the road from locals whose homes overlook the booming red-light district in Zurich.

According to the Daily Mail, police spokesman Reto Casanova said, "We can't get rid of prostitution, so have to learn how to control it."

Prostitution is legal in Switzerland. In 2007, that country's sex industry racked up an estimated $2.6 billion in revenue.

Swissinfo.ch reports, "In neighbouring Germany, Italy and France, the legal age for prostitution is 18... Switzerland remains a European exception, and girls as young as 16 can in theory legally sell their services in parts of the country."

Christian Democrat Luc Barthassat in April called for legislators to raise the legal age to 18. He told swissinfo.ch, “Switzerland risks becoming a major sex tourism destination.”

A local politician, Jeannette Schlegel added, "It’s absurd that young people under 18 are not allowed to watch pornographic films, but are allowed to take part in them.”

In Switzerland, human trafficking and coercing a person into prostitution carry hefty prison sentences. According to the 2010 Trafficking in Persons Report, this country is not exempt from the sex trafficking crisis.

It is at the Tier 2 level, worse off, according to the report, than the U.S.

takepart.com

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